I have lost it

Discussion in 'Riding Techniques' started by faffi, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    Not that I ever had it, of course...

    What I have lost is the ability to toss the bike into a corner, limited only by cornering clearance (remember the relics I ride). This has been replaced by a genuine fear of falling down. I can ride relaxed (after troubling with that for a couple of seasons as well), but I cannot for the life of me go past my self-inflicted barriers. Where I used to simply expect the tyres to stick, my feeling is now that they will go, even if the rationl(?) part of my brain tells me it will all be fine.

    And this is actually a very good thing :up: It will increase my survival ratio substantially. The only downside is the humiliation of carrying chicken strips. I can live with that - and being called a >jerkoff I just put on the "I'm old and responsible" face :lol:
     
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  3. mikedufty

    mikedufty New Member

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    Relevant Fred Gassit
    http://fredgassit.tripod.com/fred004.gif

    I chucked the bike on its side out on a left turn from a red light this week and had the front tyre slide. Kind of cool since it just did a wobble and didn't crash, but disconcerting because I didn't expect it and don't know if it was skill or luck that it wasn't worse. Not sure if there was something on the road, or just the newish bike is not as good as I think it is.
     
  4. smythie

    smythie Casey Stoner Award
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    I've been there all my life on the bike. More so these days since I had that 4 year break.
     
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  5. Yeldarb

    Yeldarb Two wheels short...

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    The only problem with the Blade is its ability to go around corners. It is too fucking good and needs someone who is less scared of what is around the next blind corner.

    ....and of course the fact that can't put knobbies on it.
     
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  6. JNO

    JNO New Member

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    Without doubt, age is a big factor, more so if you take a break from hooning and so wean yourself off adrenaline. Age will slow you down because your sense of mortality somehow gets stronger and, if you have half a brain cell, you accept that your ageing body just doesn't have the reflexes and strength that it used to have. Also, your mental ability to process what's going on around you diminishes.

    Of course I'm not saying we all turn into feeble cabbages when we pass 50, just that the sensible ones will recognise the changes and adapt. However, just like some women in their 50s will still wear mini skirts and skimpy tops, some men steadfastly refuse to swap the sportsbike for a tourer. I'm not saying you can't prolong your hooning career beyond 50 - as some racers have proven - but just like physical sports, it takes a heck of a lot more work to stay sharp - more work than most of us can or will put in.

    The adrenaline thing should not be underestimated, either. This actually affected me earlier than age. It was moving to Oz that did it. Soon after arriving, I realised I no longer had a clue which way an unknown road was likely to go, nor what hazards might lie around the corner. Coupled with having no bike for a couple of years, this forced me to slow down. It only took a year or so of no adrenaline rush to wean me off it, to the extent where I actually no longer enjoyed going fast.
     
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  7. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    I believe age is definitely a factor - I'll be 49 in a month. Also, having smashed my body asunder several times seems to finally hit home. Finally, having suffered lots of unexpected slides have robbed me of a lot of confidence. I cannot remember tyres would slide 20-30 years ago in normal brisk riding, but so many of my tyres have acted unpredictably later it isn't funny. Could be me, of course, doing things wrongly or imagining things - or noticing things I used to ignore. Hard to tell, but disconcerting nonetheless.

    Other than that, I have never been and adrenaline junky. Instead, I was after the feeling of control. Although I knew it was imagined - you do not actually have control when scraping the engine cover and other stuff around a blind, unfamiliar corner - the sensation was fantastic. But I always slowed if I didn't feel totally in control. Now I slow down all the time because that sensation of control has gone when I surpass the safe limit for the condtions and my meagre level of skill.
     
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  8. anttisexual

    anttisexual Pastafarian biker :)

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    I think I ride faster now then when I was younger. Actually, I barely ride at all, but when I did a few track days at age 40 I was enourmously faster than track days at around 30, on the same bike. I was lighter, obviously, but that doesn't account for very much difference. All I did in the mean time was think about it. And perhaps I improve as I age. I can't wait to be 50, or even better 60 :lol:
     
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  9. anttisexual

    anttisexual Pastafarian biker :)

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    Actually, on more reflection, perhaps it is a shear lack of road riding that has improved my speed. In the old days I was a road rider - i.e. ride with huge reserve, gently into corners, no load on the fornt, not using the available space, no serious commitment. Obviously this is context of track riding, but I now feel like every time I jump on a bike I want to scream hard at the first apex with load on the front, and start using all the track. Not a road riding approach at all. Last long road ride I went on, Gp 2011 trip with the supermotard and ridiculous grip alpha 12s, I felt like I was travelling very slowly all the time, and the poor tyres did nothing in the corners :lol:

    So there's your answer faff. Take up racing. And riding pushies. And tell the local sportsbike cocksuckers to stick their chicken strips up their asses :up:
     
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  10. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    Some riders, doesn't have to be racers, are incredibly fast even well into their 70s. Like Antti said, it's about the attitude more than anything. So I've lost the attitude in that the sensation of cornering fast isn't worth the added risk on the road anymore. I also think it's easier to get to this stage as one gets older, just like most people tend to mellow and be less angry as they age.
     
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  11. pneumatic

    pneumatic aka Wes

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    Well you could if you wanted to
    [video=youtube;A0d3B7MPqUg]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0d3B7MPqUg[/video]

    I have the opposite problem. Now I have started doing trackdays on sticky tyres my brain gets reprogrammed to what a normal speed is.

    When I go to work the next day I often throw the Vstrom through the first T-intersection and scrape the pegs and push the front end so it chatters across the lane with understeer. Then I have to recalibrate my brain back to road grip on adventure tyres. :)
     
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