Enfield Continental GT 535 vs BMW HP4 S1000RR

Discussion in 'New Models' started by faffi, Apr 4, 2014.

  1. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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  3. Dunger King

    Dunger King Apprentice Strom-Trooper

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    but the beemer is at idle and the enfield is just about to explode :)
     
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  4. jonescg

    jonescg my real name is Chris.

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    I saw a bloke with a 40 year old Triumph trying to ride up Banksia St in Joondanna but the poor thing conked out half way up.

    Now, I have ridden my pushbike up there without cracking a sweat (with a bit of practice) so this poor machine was struggling with the few ponies it had.

    Some power is a good thing.
     
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  5. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    The testers concluded that the HP4 was hard work. Very hard work. And on a hairpin road, it often had less cornering speed than the GT. Because the rider arrived at a scary pace, jumped on the brakes too hard too early and blew the corner. The riding position makes it hard to keep weight off the handlebars, but if you don't you upset the bike. After 30 minutes of fanging, the HP4 rider is sweating and very tired. The GT rider is fresh and enjoying the start of a long ride.

    Of course, the HP4 is a much better bike if you talk about outright performance. But I'd take the GT every day of the week. The way it's performance was described reminded me of my former Z400 twin. Fun on backroads, a bit less fun on main roads and dreary on highways. But since I do what I can to stay on backroads and off highways, there is - barely - enough performance when you have about 30 hp for solo riding. 200 is simply ridiculous on public roads.
     
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  6. SCC

    SCC Old slow and forgetful

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    A HP4 hosed me off the lights the other day and I live in the land of Expensive motors and not often beaten.
    For a start the HP4 is at 100kph after 25 metres so unless you on a goat track with 180 dregee hairpins every 20 metres the Enfield wouldn't be within sight after the first 3 corners.
    This article wasn't written on April fools day?
     
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  7. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    The HP4 did beat the GT handsomely, but it was hard work. Not to beat the GT, but because the HP4 doesn't lend to gentle cruising. So when the rider tries to ride hard, on a more or less unfamiliar road similar to the one in the picture below, he or she will often find that things happen faster than they can manage properly. In other words, they get a bit anxious. Also, judging your braking point from 200 kph entering a sharp, unfamiliar hairpin is pretty difficult compared to doing the same thing from 100 kph. Hence the midcorner speed was often faster on the GT because there was more time to get things right, less hectics.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. anttisexual

    anttisexual Pastafarian biker :)

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    Nice looking road, probably be fun on the pushie. Maybe get a 1000 for the trip up :lol:

    One amusing thing about modern 1000s is how tame they make them feel. Ride an early R1 or GSXR1000 and think, wow 120~130 hp is awesome. Jump on a modern 160hp CBR1000 or 180hp BMW and expect to be astounded. The initial feeling is, ummm... where's the beef? But then you exit turn 12 at PI, 200 km/h and gas fully and finally letting them rev, then "ahhh, so that's where it is!" :lol: Anyway, 1000s had some balls... 10~15 years ago... :up:
     
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  9. trev

    trev The Boss
    The Boss Administrator Super Mod

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    That's for sure Antti. A 128hp ZX-9R or 131hp (rear wheel) original R1 felt absolutely crazy. The latest genuine 180hp rear wheel sportsbikes almost feel a bit tame in comparison for the most part. And riding Maxwell's Chamnpionship winning 218hp (at tyre) at Phillip Island at my slow pace felt so much easier than riding a 150hp Superbike of ten years ago at the same sort of slow pace. It's amazing really, in fact I reckon Wayne's Title winning GSX-R felt easier to ride than a standard BMW S 1000 RR.
     
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  10. darren

    darren :)
    Super Mod

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    The K5 Gixxer is the ballsiest motor I have ever experienced.
     
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  11. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    I have not ridden any of the bikes mentioned, but I can relate to how the Enfield runs - and not at all how the HP4 operates. Here is a bit of the article translated for the two of you that might care.

    A superlight crank, an optimized gas exchange and a fine sophisticated map for ignition timing, injection quantity and throttle opening guarantee a lust for revs that is hard to describe. The HP4 engine combines the revs of a 600 - 14 200 rpm rev limiter - with the engine power of a 1000. It feels as if there is no end to its speed potential, the faster it goes, the more it seems to want to go faster still. It is what the Royal Enfield Continental GT may not be - a motorcycle for rapid change of pace.

    This doesn't come for free. The HP4 require the willingness to work hard. To sit comfortably relaxed on the HP4 like on the Royal Enfield Continental GT doesn't work with the BMW. If you want to sit upright behind the low-lying handlebars it will demand straight arms, which again take away the sensitivity required to feed the bike the right inputs. Despite being leaned way forward over the BMW, the rider must try to keep as much of the weight of his upper body over the legs, back and neck muscles to steer with a light hand. And he needs to shift his body, depending on the driving situation, to the inside of the curve, move forward or backward . Not only is there always something to do, but there is on the BMW HP4 always something more that should be done. The higher acceleration and braking forces also affect the rider.

    During the photo shoot with the Royal Enfield Continental GT and the BMW HP4 for this story things didn't immediately go to plan. Above all, the BMW demonstrated during multiple runs through a curve combination , what is important for her. After the rider had done a few runs to learn the lines and warm the tyres, he worked the throttle harder - and instantly found himself in trouble. Because the short not-even-straight straights between the corners, the HP4 exploded forwards so rapidly that it became almost impossible to take the next righthander. On the next try, things went better - only for the rider to get into trouble on the following lefthander. It took several tries before the right-left-right combination had been learned. And then it was like a door was opened to the amazing capabilities of the HP4. Due to the bike's extreme dynamic qualities, the peak of the current technology, demand that the bike is operated very precisely. Most riders can only achieve this through repetitions, which means going to a track and practice. Over and over. Basically, the HP4 is miles away from the demands of normal, daily traffic. It's a bike for the practiced trajectory and the final few percent of the performance envelope.

    The mountain ride showed clearly how the technology of the bike influence the rider's psyche. On the GT, you enter the braking points much slower than on the HP4, you find yourself already closer to the prescribed cornering speed and have more time to observe and act. Hence you will hit your entrance speed much better and end up cornering faster. You could also say that the GT runs a more even pace with smoother lines. However, the immense power of the HP4 let it accelerate out of the corners like mad, fast enough to set off alarm bells in the rider's head with the result that he hit the brakes too early for the upcoming corner. And he also slows down more than required, unable to properly set his speed. Time and concentration is also lost while moving around on the seat to hang off in the proper direction which the HP4 demands in order to react properly. Or at least that's how it feels. Because this is basically a track bike, and that's where its qualities can come to proper use.


    As mentioned, out of corners the HP4 is quickly way ahead of the GT. But that only brings more stress for the upcoming corner, hard braking put strain on the arms and so on. Fast, fascinating, but tiring. After about 30 minutes of mountain riding, the riders on the HP4 would feel the results. But on the GT, riding farther and longer is easy. The brakes work, the suspension is properly calibrated. The bike is nimble yet stable and laways follow the prescribed line. The seating position is relaxed with handlebars placed sufficiently high. After three corners the confidence is already there to push harder. If the rider so desire, he can lay down on the long fuel tank, but he doesn't have to. That's why it's so much easier to keep in control when things get a bit hectic.
     
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